Making new AC lines for my LS swapped 1991 Mustang

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dannyual320
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Re: Making new AC lines for my LS swapped 1991 Mustang

Post by dannyual320 »

tbirdtbird wrote: Sat Feb 25, 2023 6:53 pm "Hose clamping to a barb fitting "
Yikes!! I don't want to be there when it is started up.

And when I click the link to the Amazon pictures, that site overtook my computer and wiped the forum off, I could not get back to Tim's site.
I had to load a fresh new screen and re-logon.
Won't be visiting Amazon again any time soon.....
I'm very sorry that the link crashed you off of this forum. If anyone else has a problem with their computer opening up the links, I'll just delete them.
tbirdtbird
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Re: Making new AC lines for my LS swapped 1991 Mustang

Post by tbirdtbird »

Don't worry too much about it, it was a fixable problem. I really do not understand it. I buy from Amazon all the time. Have to wonder if there is some malware embedded somehow. Did you surf that link yourself or through a third party website
When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: www.ACKits.com
dannyual320
Posts: 88
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2020 2:23 pm
Location: Montgomery, TX (just north of Houston)

Re: Making new AC lines for my LS swapped 1991 Mustang

Post by dannyual320 »

DetroitAC wrote: Sat Feb 25, 2023 8:42 am swapping an LS3 into a Mustang is understandable, especially if you have a true LS3 aluminum block and not a truck engine iron block, but Coyote swapping is getting more popular and you could keep it all blue oval.

There are aftermarket suppliers of complete custom hose assemblies, I don't think Tim at AC kits does it, but I could be wrong? You can specify the first end fitting, the length, service or switch ports, the last end fitting, and order online, cheaper than you can fool around with doing it yourself.

You can also buy an LS3 swap ac compressor fitting, that will adapt the compressor to "standard" aftermarket tube-O fittings, then you can fit up your custome hoses. Search Google for LS3 swap ac compressor fittings. LS3 compressor is sometimes a V7 variable, easiest path to use them is to use an accumulator/orifice tube and not a TXV. Which compressor do you have?

Hose clamping to a barb fitting is making me cringe over here, don't do it, or at least don't describe it :D
I want to clarify something here. No where did I say I was going to use a hose clamp on the accumulator's barbed fitting! Now tbird also thinks that I'm going to use a hose clamp on this barbed fitting.


This ***should*** be a link to a picture of a ferrule to be crimped over barrier hose:

https://www.hy-capacity.com/userdocs/pr ... 2_1_xl.jpg

I've never built my own AC hoses and I was hoping that this thread would get me some confirmation that this is what I would use to crimp barrier hose over the accumulator's barbed fitting. I've been researching youtube and I haven't been able to find a video of anyone crimping AC barrier hose over a barbed fitting.
dannyual320
Posts: 88
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2020 2:23 pm
Location: Montgomery, TX (just north of Houston)

Re: Making new AC lines for my LS swapped 1991 Mustang

Post by dannyual320 »

tbirdtbird wrote: Sat Feb 25, 2023 10:59 pm Don't worry too much about it, it was a fixable problem. I really do not understand it. I buy from Amazon all the time. Have to wonder if there is some malware embedded somehow. Did you surf that link yourself or through a third party website
I've used my wife's amazon account to "host" pictures in the past without any ill effects. I used it again here so it is surprising that it caused you problems.

I simply upload a picture and then get the picture's link and use it in my post so people can view the picture that I want them to see.
tbirdtbird
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Re: Making new AC lines for my LS swapped 1991 Mustang

Post by tbirdtbird »

1. Don't know about this Amazon hosting stuff, but I still would not worry about it.
2. I make my own hoses and have my own crimper, but have never used reduced barrier hose.
It is not clear to me if u r gonna use standard hose or reduced barrier hose.
3. Why is there a hole on the ferrule? So you can see that the hose went all the way on the barb.
4. You will have to rent or buy a crimper. You must use an AC crimper. Crimpers for hydraulic lines will not properly work
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLz8eHcq4kA
You could also have Cold Hose in FL make what you want
When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: www.ACKits.com
dannyual320
Posts: 88
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2020 2:23 pm
Location: Montgomery, TX (just north of Houston)

Re: Making new AC lines for my LS swapped 1991 Mustang

Post by dannyual320 »

2. I'm new to this but my research led me to believe that reduced barrier hose has the same ID as regular barrier hose with a smaller OD allowing for tighter radius bends, taking up less space but providing the same amount of durability. The hose is less thick so I don't know how it's as durable but that what I keep reading. I figured, why not give it a try?

3. So this ferrule is what I'd use to crimp the hose to the barbed fitting, right? I'll make sure that the hose is visible through the little hole.

4. I'm planning on buying a crimper because I'll be using it more than once. After the Mustang project, I've got another car to LS swap; my original car that I've owned since brand new. It's a 1980 Camaro Z28 and it's getting an LS7.

The video was very helpful. Thank you.
DetroitAC
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Re: Making new AC lines for my LS swapped 1991 Mustang

Post by DetroitAC »

Sorry, I didn't mean to malign you about hose clamps, I just made an assumption.

I kinda understand the mentality of buying tools, but a hose crimper is pretty extreme. I think you can specify a custom suction hose, have it made and crimped by guys who do that work everyday and delivered to your door for under $100. If you have 50 LS swaps to complete you might be able to pay off a hose crimper, or maybe there is a hose crimper that is entirely manual out there?

I realize you are quite far along in this project and you have some Ford compressor mounted to the LS. BUT, I would suggest you seriously consider mounting the Corvette stock compressor. Pulley alignment, tensioner and bracket is 100% bulletproof. The internally variable V7 is perfect for a hot rod or swap vehicle when running an orifice tube/accumulator. It just pulls the evap down to the correct pressure and keeps it there. It also reduces it's stroke as the engine revs up, so keeps more power going to the tires. No need to mess with pressure switches, thermistor, evap icing up, the V7 takes care by itself.
dannyual320
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Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2020 2:23 pm
Location: Montgomery, TX (just north of Houston)

Re: Making new AC lines for my LS swapped 1991 Mustang

Post by dannyual320 »

Detroit, thank you for your suggestion of using the modern, variable compressor. In hindsight, I think that I should've done that in the first place.

Since I feel like I'm just talking with my car "cyber buddies" here, I'll explain why I used the OEM Ford components that I used for my LS swap. I ordered a brand new 1991 Mustang GT and drove it until Feb 2016. I used to live by the beach in north Florida and the saltwater air rusted the GT. I had to pull it off the road. The mechanicals were perfect and the R1345a AC that I'd converted in 2007 (or 2008) blew 40 degrees out of the vents. I decided to use as much of the GT in my replacement Fox Body as possible with the exception of the engine (225hp 5.0-pathetic by today's standards!) and the 5-speed T5 transmission. I'm a 6-speed guy and my coupe has a Tremec T56 Magnum in it.

A company called ICT Billet makes billet aluminum brackets that are made right in Wichita, KS. Their LS swap front end accessory drive (FEAD) Fox Body brackets mount the OEM Ford power steering pump as well as the OEM compressor to the front of LS engines. The brackets are like eye candy. Beautiful! I thought it was a cool idea to use some of the GT's parts and these brackets allowed me to do so.

I had to rebuild my OEM Ford power steering pump which I'd never done before. I'm not sure that I'd recommend it but I'm always up for a mechanical project challenge. The 1991 GT's AC compressor is now 32 yrs old and I'm not sure that it's a good idea to try to use it, either. However, both of those components are currently bolted to the front of my LS3 and I'm going to give them a try. If they prove to not work correctly, then I'll have to buy an all new FEAD that'll mount a General Motors power steering pump and a GM compressor.

As I mentioned, I'm always up for a mechanical project challenge. I really want to tackle building my own refrigerant hoses. I'll need custom hoses for my next car project and I might need to make a second set of hoses for this car if I end up replacing the OEM Ford stuff with new, GM stuff.
dannyual320
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Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2020 2:23 pm
Location: Montgomery, TX (just north of Houston)

Re: Making new AC lines for my LS swapped 1991 Mustang

Post by dannyual320 »

I've been spending a log of time online trying to learn more about these barbed fittings and the Ford Springlock fittings.

As far as the Springlock fittings go, it appears that the only ones that I could find have a beadlock end that only fits standard barrier hose. I made a phone call to an AC hose place in Florida and they told me that yes, the springlock fittings only take a standard barrier hose on the "beadlock" side. I was told that I could take a cutoff wheel and remove the standard hose ferrule. Then I purchase a reduced barrier hose ferrule used on barbed fittings. Crimp that ferrule over the reduced barrier hose and all is good.

I've never done this. It's just what was told to me over the phone a little while ago. Comments?

One more thing; last night during my research, one online retailer had a manual, wrench operated crimper that was to only be used on those separate, barb fitting ferrules. The description said that this particular crimper only worked on those separate ferrules and not the beadlock ferrules. I was planning on buying one of those hydraulic crimpers (like a Mastercool 71500) and crimping both the beadlock fittings as well as the ferrules over my accumulator's barbed fitting. Now I'm not sure that one crimper will do all of that.
tbirdtbird
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Re: Making new AC lines for my LS swapped 1991 Mustang

Post by tbirdtbird »

I partially understand what you are trying to do and partially do not. Last I knew reduced barrier hose is more expensive and in my opinion not needed. We have all been using standard hose for decades without problems. A good crimping kit will, however, have dies for both kinds of hose. Definitely get a hydraulic crimper, you will go nuts with the manual kind. Look carefully at the product description. Crimp until the jaws touch each other. Stay in one place, do not move the jaws around at all. Leave about 1/8th inch of a cuff of metal that is not crimped. Do not get too close to the base of the metal where it attaches to the barb fitting. There are pictures of a properly crimped hose all over the internet.

I am not sure if Tim offers the crimper I have in mind. He has a lot of stuff he has not had time to catalogue on the site. Send him an email and ask, he is very responsive, and his phone line is swamped as you might well imagine, so he prefers email.

Certainly there are AC shops out there that do a lot more crimping than we do, but we do our share and having the crimper on-site is extremely convenient. We had been borrowing a friends but decided to get our own.

You have come to the right place for assistance. That is what we do. And please remember that pix are VERY helpful for us to understand what you are doing. I personally would not hold much hope for that 32 yr old comp. At the very least it will not be as efficient as todays comps.
When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: www.ACKits.com
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